4:29 AM 10/9/2017 – Why Are There So Many Conflicting Numbers on Mass Shootings? | ‘This shooter is a little different’: Hamline professor studies mass shootings

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Why Are There So Many Conflicting Numbers on Mass Shootings?

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No one would argue over whether the horrific massacre at a Las Vegas concert on Sunday, which claimed the lives of 58 people and injured over 500 more, fits the definition of a mass shooting. Nor does anyone quibble over that classification for the Orlando nightclub shooting that killed 49 and injured 53, or Sandy Hook, or Virginia Tech, or any of the other outbursts of gun violence that have claimed hundreds of lives in past decade alone.

But what about the Plano, Texas man who fatally shot his estranged wife and seven other people at a private party just last week? Or the 25-year-old man who opened fire during a church service in Antioch, Tenn. just a few days earlier, killing one parishioner and wounding seven, many of whom remained hospitalized days later?

Under the current federal definition, authorized by President Obama in January 2013, a “mass killing” must involve at least three deaths and occur in a “place of public use,” disqualifying both the Antioch and Plano incidents. A Congressional Research Service Report published two months later acknowledged a lack of consensus on the issue and used its own definition, which required four or more deaths, not including the shooter, occurring in a public place and a gunman “who select victims somewhat indiscriminately.”

As others have already noted, there is a widespread disagreement on what constitutes a mass shooting. The Washington Post‘s Christopher Ingraham identified three broad categories, from the one used by Mother Jones magazine (and TIME), which also limits incidents to public places and three deaths not including the shooter, to the broad categorization used by the non-profit Gun Violence Archive, which includes any incident in which four people were killed or injured, leading to much higher incident counts.

To wit: A Vox article on Monday reports that “[t]here have been more than 1,500 mass shootings since Sandy Hook,” using Gun Violence Archive Data, while Mother Jones‘ database contains only 29 mass shootings in that time. Neither are incorrect. But the discrepancy can easily lead to confusion when different outlets report vastly different numbers using the same term.

“It’s a tricky issue here,” says Avery Gardiner, the co-president of the Brady Campaign to End Gun Violence. The Brady Campaign defines mass shootings as incidents with four or more deaths, not including the shooter — but doesn’t limit the definition to public places or anonymous rampages.

“Some define a public mass shooting as one where the people were chosen indiscriminately. That doesn’t seem right to me,” Gardiner says. She adds that she would “absolutely” include the Plano, Texas incident. “I’d be very uncomfortable with any definition that minimized the role of domestic violence,” she says.

While the definition of a mass shooting may seem like a fairly technical or semantic debate, it has the power to drive the media narrative and the public perception of the scope of gun violence in the U.S. A universally accepted definition is unlikely, but greater transparency in how outlets report the numbers is important when the figures vary so drastically.

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How the erosion of trust leads to murders and mass shootings – Washington Post

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Washington Post
How the erosion of trust leads to murders and mass shootings
Washington Post
When society is functioning well, we should, at the very least, be able to trust that the people around us won’t try to kill us. And yet, after a mass shooting, we may wonder. We may worry in the subsequent days and weeks as we send our kids off to 

‘This shooter is a little different’: Hamline professor studies mass shootings

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  1. Listen Hamline professor building database on mass shooters

The gunman at last Sunday night’s shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas is entry number 134 in a database of mass shooters that two Twin Cities professors are building.

Jillian Peterson, a Hamline University assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, and James Densley, an associate professor of criminal justice at Metropolitan State University, hope to better understand why mass shootings happen and identify ways to prevent them.

They’re focused on shootings that happen in a public place with four or more victims and aren’t family or gang-related. Peterson and Densley code mass shooters according to 50 different variables. Peterson said they go deep into shooters’ histories and look at past trauma, their parents, mental illness, their relationships with other people and their social media profiles.

From what Peterson has read about Stephen Paddock, the alleged shooter in Las Vegas, she said she’s curious to see how he fits in.

“This shooter is a little different, compared to the data we have,” said Peterson, a forensic psychologist. “He’s significantly older than average, the average age is mid-30s. Social media presence is also something we usually see, some sort of radicalization on social media or wanting to go viral on social media. In this case the shooter was not active on social media, didn’t seem to have any social media accounts.”

They’re still in the process of building data, so Peterson said they don’t have definitive statistics. But she has seen two things surface repeatedly– hopelessness and a need for notoriety in life or in death.

But trying to predict future shootings and who is most at risk can be difficult, said Peterson. “The problem is that finding a mass shooter is like finding a needle in a haystack. So, for every person that fits the profile and does a shooting there’s probably a million people that fit the profile and don’t do a shooting.”

She and Densley would like to make their database open to the public, once they finish building it. But she’s cautious about how such data could be used. “People can be labeled and be seen as risky and they’re not, and I think we don’t want to start picking up people because they seem risky.” She said information is powerful and important, but so is recognizing its limits.

On Monday, Oct. 16, Peterson and Densley will host a free public discussion on their data at Hamline University.

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‘This shooter is a little different’: Hamline professor studies mass shootings – Minnesota Public Radio News

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Minnesota Public Radio News
‘This shooter is a little different’: Hamline professor studies mass shootings
Minnesota Public Radio News
Jillian Peterson, a Hamline University assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, and James Densley, an associate professor of criminal justice at Metropolitan State University, hope to better understand why mass shootings happen and 

Analysis: Why hasn’t Israel been the victim of mass shootings? – The Jerusalem Post mobile website

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The Jerusalem Post mobile website
Analysis: Why hasn’t Israel been the victim of mass shootings?
The Jerusalem Post mobile website
Meanwhile, in the US, there have been 1,500 mass shootings since 2012. During that period, more than 1,700 people were killed and 6,000 wounded by guns. American statistics show that there are more guns than people and some people have ten or more …

and more »

Las Vegas massacre distresses Filipino family in Cavite – Inquirer.net

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Inquirer.net
Las Vegas massacre distresses Filipino family in Cavite
Inquirer.net
Marilou Danley recently visited this house owned by her brother, Reynaldo Bustos, in Dasmariñas City, Cavite. —Clifford Nuñez. DASMARIÑAS CITY — The gambler who shot and killed 58 people watching a concert on the Las Vegas Strip from his high-rise …

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Las Vegas killer Stephen Paddock ‘may have had a severe undiagnosed mental illness’ – Mirror.co.uk

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Mirror.co.uk
Las Vegas killer Stephen Paddock ‘may have had a severe undiagnosed mental illness’
Mirror.co.uk
Las Vegas mass killer Stephen Paddock may have had a severe undiagnosed mental illness, according to investigators. FBI profilers and behavioral scientists have been trying to better understand what drove Paddock to open fire on the music festival 
Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock calculated where to shoot to kill maximum number of peopleWashington Examiner
Investigators probe cryptic note, prostitute links in baffling case of Stephen PaddockThe Australian
Police ‘Confident’ No One Else in Shooter’s Room Before Las Vegas AttackNBCNews.com
The Sun –Fox News –New Zealand Herald
all 441 news articles »

Paddock note – Google Search

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Story image for Paddock note from ABC News

Las Vegas gunman’s nightstand note contained figures for wind …

ABC News9 hours ago
note containing handwritten numbers for wind, trajectory, and distance was discovered by Steven Paddock’s body inside the Las Vegas hotel …
Story image for Paddock note from CBS News

Details on Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock’s note

CBS News15 hours ago
The calculations were on a note found by the team that stormed Paddock’s room and were the first to see his body and the room-full of arms …
Story image for Paddock note from CBS News

Note in Las Vegas gunman’s hotel room included details of bullet …

CBS NewsOct 7, 2017
Members of the law enforcement team who were the first to enter Stephen Paddock’s hotel room after he opened fire on a crowd in Las Vegas.
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Note in Stephen Paddock’s room – Google Search

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Las Vegas Officers Describe Finding an ‘Armory’ in Stephen …

<a href=”http://NBCNews.com” rel=”nofollow”>NBCNews.com</a>5 hours ago
… Describe Finding an ‘Armory’ in Stephen Paddock’s Hotel Room … what looked like “an armory” and a note with calculations to magnify the …
Las Vegas police confident Paddock was only shooter, but still no …
Local SourceLas Vegas Review-JournalOct 7, 2017
The note Stephen Paddock left in his hotel room in Las Vegas
In-DepthNew Zealand HeraldOct 7, 2017

Numbers on note in Las Vegas hotel room helped gunman Stephen Paddock to aim

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Las Vegas: Investigators believe a note found in the Las Vegas shooter’s hotel room contained a series of numbers that helped him calculate more precise shots.

A law enforcement official told AAP the numbers found on a note on Stephen Paddock’s hotel night stand included the distance between the high-rise hotel room that Stephen Paddock was using as a perch and the concert the victims were attending.

“I could see on it he had written the distance, the elevation he was on, the drop of what his bullet was gonna be for the crowd,” said Officer Dave Newton of the Las Vegas Police Department’s K-9 unit, the NY Daily News reported.

“So he had that written down and figured out so he would know where to shoot to hit his targets from there.”

The new details added a chilling new dimension to the sophisticated planning Paddock made to carry out the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

Investigators are still trying to determine a motive.

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He killed 58 people and wounded hundreds of others last Sunday before taking his own life.

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Earlier on Saturday US Vice-President Mike Pence spoke at a prayer service in Las Vegas honouring the victims.

Pence said those killed were taken before their time. But he said, “Their names and their stories will forever be etched into the hearts of the American people.”

Fifty-eight doves were released outside on the steps of City Hall. They flew in a wide arc before disappearing into the distance as someone shouted, “God bless America!”

Investigators are still trying to work out what led Paddock to carry out the attack.

AP 

Room Service Receipts Show Hotel Delivered Food to Stephen Paddock’s Suite for 2 People

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Note in Stephen Paddock’s room enhanced shooter’s aim

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Last updated 18:36, October 8 2017

A note left on the table in Paddock's hotel room contained numbers that are being analysed.@MikeTokes

A note left on the table in Paddock’s hotel room contained numbers that are being analysed.

Investigators believe a note found in the Las Vegas shooter’s hotel room contained a series of numbers that helped him calculate more precise shots.

A law enforcement official said on Saturday (Sunday) that the numbers found on a note on a nightstand included the distance between the high-rise hotel room that Stephen Paddock was using as a perch and the concert the victims were attending.

The official wasn’t authorised to discuss the details of the investigation publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Accused Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock, right, is shown with his brother Eric Paddock in a 2002 family photo.PADDOCK FAMILY

Accused Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock, right, is shown with his brother Eric Paddock in a 2002 family photo.

Investigators are still trying to determine why Paddock committed the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history.

READ MORE:
Billboards ask for tips on gunman
Gunman left behind cryptic note
Paddock, Islamic State and the mystery of motive
Kiwi family caught up in Vegas horror with 4-year-old
Hotel to take drastic measures to erase shooting

US Vice President Mike Pence is joined by his wife, Karen, as he speaks in Las Vegas City Hall.STEVE MARCUS

US Vice President Mike Pence is joined by his wife, Karen, as he speaks in Las Vegas City Hall.

He killed 58 people and wounded hundreds of others last Sunday before taking his own life.

Earlier US Vice President Mike Pence spoke at a prayer service in Las Vegas honouring the 58 victims killed last Sunday.

Pence says those killed were taken before their time. But he says, “Their names and their stories will forever be etched into the hearts of the American people.”

Fifty-eight doves were released outside on the steps of City Hall. They flew in a wide arc before disappearing into the distance as someone shouted, “God bless America!”

Investigators are still trying to figure out what led Paddock to carry out the attack.

 – AAP

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Las Vegas shooting followed a depressingly familiar routine – The Guardian

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The Guardian
Las Vegas shooting followed a depressingly familiar routine
The Guardian
Which is why, in a macabre way, Las Vegas left me curiously unmoved. Senseless violence? Yes. Communities grieving? Yes. Ways forward? Nil. Exhaustive coverage, somehow to such a set routine as to seem almost beside the point. All the Mandalay Bay …

Las Vegas shooting: Police reveal details of note in Stephen Paddock’s room | World | News

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Stephen Paddock opened fire on a huge crowd of music fans from the 32nd floor of the building, killing 58 people and injuring almost 500.

Police found Paddock dead after bursting into his hotel room following the massacre, with photos showing a notebook on a nightstand.

Now officers have revealed what was written in the notebook, giving a sick insight into the moments leading up to Paddock spraying the crowd of 22,000 people.

Officer David Newton said: “I could see on it he had written the distance, the elevation he was on, the drop of what his bullet was going to be for the crowd.

“So he had had that written down and figured out so he would know where to shoot to hit his targets from there.”

The notebook meticulously laid out how to kill the most people from his vantage point high above the helpless crowd.

Officer Newton also detailed the horrifying moment police finally breached the attacker’s hotel room, in scenes he said were like something “out of a movie”.

He said: “Very eerie. Yeah, the dust from the explosive breach and then you have the flashing lights.”

Investigators are still desperately attempting to piece together what exactly happened on the night of the deadliest shooting in US history.

Shortly before 10.05pm local time Paddock used a hammer to break two windows in his luxury Mandalay Bay resort and casino suite.

As the final performance at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival wound down, Paddock began shooting thousands of bullets into the packed crowd.

For 10 minutes the crowd attempted take shelter, with some simply lying on the ground, as Paddock picked off victims.

At 10.15pm or so the shooting stopped. Two minutes later a security guard arrived at his door and was injured when Paddock fired some 200 bullets through it.

At this point armed police arrived on the floor and began searching every room. At 10.55pm they reached Paddock’s room, forcing their way in around half an hour later.

They found Paddock dead on the floor, with officers quickly spotting the note on a table near his body.

Investigators are still clueless as to Paddock’s motive – but are not ruling out he may have had help in carrying out the slaughter.Earlier this week Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said: “Do you think this was all accomplished on his own. You’ve got to make the assumption he had to have some help at some point.”

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BOB BARR: Chris Wray at the FBI: A breath of fresh air | Opinion

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In spite of this week’s horrific news from Las Vegas, I remain convinced that Americans, on the whole, are the most kind, moral and resilient people on the planet. This is why crimes and tragedies such as mass shootings shake us to the core; they challenge what we know about ourselves, along with the sense of justice that binds together a free and peaceful society. Without faith in justice — our collective sense of knowing right from wrong — society falls apart at the seams.

Therefore, amongst all the news of tragedy this week, it behooves us to focus at least some of our emotional energy on the good news coming from a major facet of justice in American society — the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and its newly sworn-in director, Christopher Wray.

I had the honor of attending Wray’s swearing-in ceremony in Washington last week; and the praise directed to him during the event, along with what I know of Wray from his time spent in Atlanta as an Assistant United States Attorney, as a top official at Main Justice during the second Bush Administration, and as an attorney in private practice, demonstrate there is much to be optimistic about regarding his tenure at an agency suffering through a period of waning public confidence.

Wray’s speech at his investiture was rife with heartfelt and genuine respect for the FBI as an institution, acknowledging the agency’s proud history of sacrifice and integrity in pursuit of its mission. His remarks also offered a glimpse at his refreshingly professional approach to directing the FBI. This is a welcome change of pace.

To be sure, over the decades as a watchdog of government abuse of power, I have been hard on the FBI and other federal law enforcement agencies when they fail to truly uphold the law and the Constitution. For example, the conduct of federal agencies during the Waco (1993) and Ruby Ridge (1992) sieges warranted intense scrutiny and scorn for failing to stay within both operational and legal boundaries during the incidents; and I was among those who demanded that they be held accountable.

In the short term, accountability ensures the guilty and corrupt are punished for their crimes. For the longer term, accountability is the first step in helping to ensure such mistakes are not repeated. Pleasantly, this was a theme in Wray’s remarks. The FBI’s history “hasn’t come without missteps … without errors in judgment,” said the new Director. But the former prosecutor did not leave it at that, as others might have; he continued: “But we take those mistakes, and we learn from them. We get better at doing what we need to do, and closer to being the very best we can be.”

Wray may have been referring to the historical “missteps” and “errors in judgement” like those I mentioned above, but it is not hard to infer he may also have been referring to those of his predecessor, James Comey, who took center stage in a political drama in which neither he nor the agency should ever find themselves. Fortunately, Wray carries no such baggage. “A director must know it is not about him, but about security, justice and law,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said of Wray at the ceremony; concluding that, “Director Wray meets that test in full. … He has no hidden agendas.”

This is precisely what the FBI needs at this moment in time. It needs a restart that puts its mission — “to protect the American people and uphold the Constitution,” as Wray put it — at the forefront of the agency, rather than be driven — even in part — by any political or other hidden agenda. It needs a leader who “always pursue(s) justice,” as Wray eloquently put it, echoing James Madison in the Federalist Papers that justice is indeed the ultimate goal and purpose of government; and always with a “drive and passion for excellence.” Finally, it needs a director who does not see himself as bigger than the agency he leads. Wray is that leader.

It is certainly a high bar set for him and the Bureau, but listening to Wray speak, and hearing others like Sessions speak of him, it is clear that Wray is the right man for the job, at exactly the right time. His plate is full already; but by every measure, he is well-poised to take on the challenges.

Bob Barr is a former federal prosecutor and a former Congressman. He represented Georgia’s 7th congressional district as a Republican from 1995 to 2003.

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Stephen Paddock barricaded door at Mandalay Bay Resort

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LAS Vegas sniper Stephen Paddock left no stone unturned before orchestrating the deadliest mass shooting in US history.

More details have emerged on the extraordinary planning the 64-year-old went to before he opened fire on a 22,000-strong crowd from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. At least 58 people were killed during the rampage.

Authorities said Paddock “extensively” planned the attack after discovering he set up cameras around the hotel to spy on police, even hiding one in a food service cart.

But now, a Wall Street Journal report reveals Paddock may have also had “target practice” in the desert near his home two days before the massacre.

Investigators have reportedly uncovered video footage from a home-surveillance system that shows Stephen Paddock driving alone to an area on the outskirts of Mesquite, Nevada, where locals go for target practice.

MORE: What happens to hotel room 32135 now?

VEGAS SHOOTING: Millionaire gunman’s plans

Members of the media gather in front of the home of mass murderer Stephen Paddock in Mesquite, Nevada. Picture: AFPSource:AFP

Stephen Paddock opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest Festival killing at least 58 people. Picture: Courtesy of Eric Paddock via APSource:AP

The footage shows Paddock heading to the area on the Friday before the Sunday attack, the official told the Journal. It was one spot where he reportedly practised shooting.

The video footage shows Paddock driving along a road that leads to a spot in the desert where everyone goes to shoot, the law-enforcement official added.

However, a range manager told the Journal Paddock had no military service record and never used his arsenal at the only shooting range within 32km of his home.

A spokeswoman for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Inside Stephen Paddock’s room at the Mandalay Bay hotel. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

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Police have released the first body cam footage from the Las Vegas shooting that left 60 people dead

COPS DESCRIBE 12 MINUTES OF HELL

Las Vegas police officers described in harrowing detail the tense 12 minutes they spent trying to breach the mass murderer’s lair — and the paranoia that gripped them once they were inside, the New York Post reports.

Smoke hung thick inside the room — tinged with the scent of spent gunpowder and sporadically illuminated by a blinking fire-alarm light — when officers first stepped into Mandalay Bay’s Room 32-135, where Paddock, now dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, spent the previous three days building his sniper’s nest, according to the police in an interview with CBS TV’s 60 Minutes.

The sight — and the seeming impossibility that a lone man in his 60s could have caused such carnage — only intensified the officers’ paranoia as they worked to clear the hazy hotel room, they said.

Officer Dave Newton responded to the Vegas shooting. Picture: CBS NewsSource:Supplied

“It was still very much in my brain there’s 50 other dudes in here somewhere,” Detective Matthew Donaldson recalled. “You know, we were still clearing that room, the curtains, moving the curtains. I wanted to make sure somebody wasn’t hiding between the windows and the curtains.”

They had reason to fear Paddock had help, though investigators later determined he acted alone: The first person to reach the room, Mandalay Bay security guard Jesus Campos, was met with a hail of gunfire when he had approached the door just minutes before.

By the time Paddock was done shooting at Campos, who escaped with a leg injury, the door to his room looked like “Swiss cheese,” Officer David Newton told 60 Minutes.

Police found a note containing crucial details about the shooting inside Paddock’s room at the Mandalay Bay hotel. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

Various weapons and a hammer were also found inside the room. Picture: Fox25 Boston/TwitterSource:Supplied

Newton and other officers coming from the floor below struggled to open a stairwell door that Paddock had jammed shut with metal shims and screws.

Then they saw his splintered door room and a nearby room-service cart with wires hanging off it, prompting fears it was booby-trapped. It was later revealed that Paddock had installed a camera on the cart to watch for anyone coming to stop him.

As officers prepared to blast open what was left of Paddock’s door, they worried that the slightest noise could give away their positions — and lead to another volley of gunfire from the room.

They eventually blasted open the door, revealing “an armory” inside, according to Sgt. Joshua Bitsko.

Along with hundreds of spent casings, officers found Paddock’s lifeless body on the floor. As cops stepped over the corpse and peered through smoke, the totality of Paddock’s sick project came into focus.

“Days of planning,” Bitsko said. “He had toolboxes, power tools to run wires for his surveillance systems. For everything that he had, it took him days to finish.”

Seeing the level of preparation only innervated police as they scoured the suite and adjoining room for any sign of accomplices.

When they found no one else, they left as quickly as they came.

“And then — once that scene was static it was — it was essentially a crime scene. It was, like, ‘Stop what you’re doing. Get out,’ ” Donaldson said.

Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo speaks about the Las Vegas Strip Shooting at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department headquarters. Picture: AFP/GettySource:AFP

PADDOCK: ‘I WAS BORN BAD’

The Sun reports Paddock boasted in text messages about his father Benjamin being a bank robber who escaped jail in 1969.
He wrote: “I didn’t have anything really to do with him but the bad streak is in my blood. I was born bad.”

The escort described him as “obsessive” and “paranoid” and said he would rant about conspiracy theories, including claiming 9/11 was an inside job by the US government.

The woman, 27, saw Paddock around nine times from November 2015 to June 2016 when he would visit Las Vegas without his girlfriend Marilou Danley, 62.

MORE: Sex worker reveals how gunman acted out violent rape fantasies

Stephen Paddock reportedly acted out violent sexual fantasies and bragged he was “born bad”. Picture: AFPSource:AFP

Paddock — who made $5.8 million in 2015, mostly from gambling — would pay her up to $10,000 a time.

They even stayed in the Mandalay Bay, from where he was to open fire on a music festival, slaughtering 58 before killing himself.

The escort, who does not want to be named, said: “When I first met Stephen I had left an abusive relationship and was starting all over again with nothing but the clothes I was wearing.

“He seemed like he wanted to help. We would go to the casinos together and he would spend hours drinking and gambling.

Paddock’s former girlfriend Marilou Danley. Picture: FacebookSource:Facebook

“But when he would have a winning streak, we would go back and have really aggressive and violent sex.”

The Sun was reportedly shown text messages which appeared to show Paddock discussing tying her up “as you scream for help”.

The escort broke off contact when she started a new relationship.

She said: “He had a dark and twisted side. But even so, I could never have imagined he would do something like this.”

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In this 3D motion graphic see how a gunman opens fire on a crown attending an open-air music festival from a room high up at the Mandalay Bay casino.

GUNMAN HAD ‘VANILLA PROFILE’

The owner of a casino where Stephen Paddock gambled says the Las Vegas gunman didn’t drink alcohol or show any signs of trouble when he was a customer there. Steve Wynn said in an interview on “Fox News Sunday” that Paddock had “the most vanilla profile one could possibly imagine.”

Vehicles drive past a billboard featuring a Federal Bureau of Investigation tip line phone number on Interstate 515, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Picture: GettySource:AFP

He says Paddock didn’t run up debts or have a gambling problem. Wynn said butlers, waiters and massage employees knew Paddock and his girlfriend.

Wynn also described some of the security measures his casino put in place in recent years that include magnetometers and training of housekeeping staff to report suspicious actions like a do-not-disturb sign remaining on a door for an extended period of time.

FBI RETURNS LOST BELONGINGS

Officials say they’re beginning to return personal belongings to concertgoers who were in one corner of the festival grounds.

Deputy Clark County Fire Chief John Steinbeck announced that items are being returned to people at a Family Assistance Center in the South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Members of the FBI walk among piles of personal items at the scene. Picture: APSource:AP

For now, items are being returned to people who were in the area in and around the VIP tent and bleacher seating east of the stage at the Route 91 Harvest festival.

Federal agents have spent almost a week collecting evidence amid thousands of personal items like cellphones, baby strollers, lawn chairs, backpacks, shoes and purses left behind when people scattered late October 1.

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Vegas prostitute says Stephen Paddock enjoyed violent sex

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Las Vegas prostitute who was hired by murderer Stephen Paddock has spoken out about their ‘violent’ sex sessions and how he bragged about having ‘bad blood’.

The woman, who spoke anonymously, said she would spent hours drinking and gambling in Sin City with Paddock, who she described as ‘paranoid’ and ‘obsessive’.

If he hit a winning streak, he would take her back to his room for ‘really aggressive and violent sex’ including living out rape fantasies, she said.

A prostitute who was hired by Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock has told how he harbored rape fantasies and got her to take part in 'violent' sex session
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A prostitute who was hired by Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock has told how he harbored rape fantasies and got her to take part in ‘violent’ sex session

The 27-year-old, who was not named, described Paddock as 'paranoid', 'obsessive', and said he ranted about conspiracy theories including 9/11 being 'an inside job' (pictured, the hotel from which Paddock carried out his killings)
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The 27-year-old, who was not named, described Paddock as ‘paranoid’, ‘obsessive’, and said he ranted about conspiracy theories including 9/11 being ‘an inside job’ (pictured, the hotel from which Paddock carried out his killings)

Police are questioning Las Vegas prostitutes as they try to ascertain a motive for the worst mass shooting in American history. A note with a number of phone numbers on it was found in Paddock's hotel room which police are using to make inquiries 
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Police are questioning Las Vegas prostitutes as they try to ascertain a motive for the worst mass shooting in American history. A note with a number of phone numbers on it was found in Paddock’s hotel room which police are using to make inquiries

Las Vegas police share new updates on shooter Stephen Paddock

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Paddock also boasted about his bank-robber father, saying that ‘the bad streak is in my blood’ and ‘I was born bad’, according to texts seen by the Sun on Sunday.

The 27-year-old woman said Paddock, 64, would often rant about conspiracy theories including how 9/11 was orchestrated by the US government.

The escort, who said Paddock paid her $6,000-a-time for their meetings, also had texts in which he described tying her up ‘while you scream for help’.

She spoke out after family members revealed that Paddock often consorted with prostitutes who were laid on by hotels while he paid regular visits to the city.

Officials close to the investigation into the shooting revealed that Paddock may have hired an escort in the days before the massacre.

A receipt from Paddock’s hotel room showed two people ordered room service in the days before the attack.

Family members revealed that Paddock often sought the company of prostitutes while in Vegas as they said his relationship with girlfriend Marilou Danley was 'not warm'
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Family members revealed that Paddock often sought the company of prostitutes while in Vegas as they said his relationship with girlfriend Marilou Danley was ‘not warm’

Paddock shot 58 people dead and wounded more than 500 when he opened fire on the Las Vegas Strip using an arsenal of 23 weapons
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Paddock shot 58 people dead and wounded more than 500 when he opened fire on the Las Vegas Strip using an arsenal of 23 weapons

Temporary graves have sprung up along The Strip honoring some of the victims of the tragedy, which took place a week ago
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Temporary graves have sprung up along The Strip honoring some of the victims of the tragedy, which took place a week ago

Meanwhile investigators said they are interviewing other call girls in the hope of ascertaining a motive for the worst mass shooting in American history.

In Paddock’s room, officials found a piece of paper containing a number of phone numbers but they reiterated no suicide note was found.

Law enforcement have said they are ‘confident’ Paddock carried out the Mandalay Bay massacre from his hotel room alone.

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Undersheriff Kevin McMahill said on Friday that investigators are sure no one else was in the room before he shot dead 58 and injured almost 500 on Sunday.

Earlier, NBC News had reported a mysterious charger that did not match any of Paddock’s cellphones – raising the possibility that another person had been with Paddock beforehand.

However, later police said that they have now matched all the cell phones and all the chargers and that they belong to Paddock.

Paddock boasted about having 'bad blood' because of his father Benjamin, who was once wanted by the FBI for bank robbery
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Paddock boasted about having ‘bad blood’ because of his father Benjamin, who was once wanted by the FBI for bank robbery

Benjamin was nicknamed 'Big Daddy', 'Chromedome' and 'Old Baldy' and described by FBI agents hunting him as 'psychopathic, armed and dangerous'
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Benjamin was nicknamed ‘Big Daddy’, ‘Chromedome’ and ‘Old Baldy’ and described by FBI agents hunting him as ‘psychopathic, armed and dangerous’

It was earlier revealed that Benjamin Paddock, Stephen’s father, was an FBI most-wanted bank robber and confidence man known as ‘Big Daddy’.

Nenjamin was captured in Las Vegas in 1960 – then escaped and lived on the run for a decade.

He was described as psychopathic, armed and dangerous and suicidal – and the public were told not to approach the man known as ‘Chromedome’ and ‘Old Baldy’.

Stephen was just seven years old and living in Arizona when his father Benjamin Paddock was nabbed by the FBI for a series of bank robberies.

At the time, Stephen’s mother tried desperately to shield her young son and his three siblings from the devastating news that their father was living a double life as a bank robber and con-man.

‘We’re trying to keep Steve from knowing his father is held as a bank robber,’ a neighbour told the Tucson Daily Citizen on July 29, 1960. ‘I hardly know the family, but Steve is a nice boy. It’s a terrible thing.’

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Mueller’s next move, the Steele dossier, and an NSA hack — the latest in a wild week of Trump-Russia developments – Business Insider

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Business Insider
Mueller’s next move, the Steele dossier, and an NSA hack — the latest in a wild week of Trump-Russiadevelopments
Business Insider
Investigators take cues from the explosive TrumpRussia dossier: Burr and Warner said the Senate Intelligence Committee has been working “backwards” to verify the dossier, compiled by ex-British spy Christopher Steele, which alleges several ties 
Russia dossier author offered to talk to Senate committee: reportThe Hill
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